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Winning the Peace in the Pacific S. R. Chow

Winning the Peace in the Pacific

S. R. Chow

Published March 1st 2007
ISBN : 9781406776522
Paperback
108 pages
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 About the Book 

WINNING THE PEACE IN THE PACIFIC FOREWORD As a Chinese member and former officer ot the Institute of Pacific Relations, I feel very grateful to the International Secretariat of the Institute for publishing this little book Winning the Peace in theMoreWINNING THE PEACE IN THE PACIFIC FOREWORD As a Chinese member and former officer ot the Institute of Pacific Relations, I feel very grateful to the International Secretariat of the Institute for publishing this little book Winning the Peace in the Pacific by my old friend, Pro fessor S. R. Chow. In doing so, the Institute is performing a useful service of rectifying an unfortunate situation in present-day international thinking, wherein practically all books and articles on post-war planning and peace problems have come from Anglo-Saxon writers or European scholars in exile, but almost none from Chinese authors. This dearth of authentic presentation of Chinese attitudes and aspirations regarding the post-war world in general or the more specific problems of the peace structure in the Pacific region, has created the erroneous impression that China is still too deeply engrossed in her hard and little-aided war to be able to think about the post-war problems and to present any definitive program for public discussion by the people of the United Nations. And because China has not told the outside world what she has been thinking about these problems, much of the current writing on post war problems has suffered from the fact that too little attention has been paid to the peace objectives of the Chinese people. It is to correct this situation and to awaken a new interest of the American and British public in what the Chinese people have been thinking on these important problems that the Institute of Pacific Relations is sponsor ing the publication of the views of a thoughtful and for ward-looking Chinese scholar who, though not speaking 1123106 Vi FOREWORD m anf sense For the NatipnalGovernment of China, never theless sj efi s Ifieydesires and hopes of a great many of Chinas intellectual leaders. Profe sr how, better known in China as Chou Keng sheng, is very well qualified for the task of studying and discussing the problems of post-war planning in the Pacific from a Chinese standpoint. As a student, he spent five years in Japan, five years in England and Scotland and three years in France. He was in England during the First World War and in Paris at the time of the Peace Conference. He taught international law and international relations in three Chinese national universities in the interval between two world wars. He was a victim of Japans war in China, lost all his books and other earthly possessions by Japanese bombing, and followed his university into exile. He was a Chinese delegate to the I. P. R. Conference at Virginia Beach 1939 and Mont Tremblant 1942. Since October 1939, he has been staying in the United States, making a special study of the war and international problems after the war. Ever since his student days, he has been a warm admirer of the democratic institutions and ways of life of Great Britain, the United States and the democracies of Western Europe. His scholarship, political independence and intellectual integrity have won him the high respect of Chinese government leaders as well as of the Chinese student world. Very few Chinese scholars are so well equipped by long residence abroad and conscientious training in international thinking as Professor Chow to undertake to write the first book on what the Chinese people want to see set up in the Pacific area when this terrible war is over. Professor Chow, of course, does not expect that hisreaders will agree with him on all the points in his peace FOREWORD Vll program for the Pacific. Although he was my house guest in Washington for nearly three years and he and I had almost daily chats on various problems of war and peace, we do not agree, for instance, on his proposal of a regional organization for the Pacific. Personally I do not think such a regional agency is necessary. In the first place, I believe there are no purely regional problems which should require so elaborate a regional organization as is outlined in Professor Chows book...